8 things Indian bikers should be thankful for

A lot of us complain about how people in other countries have it better than we do here in India. While it might be true sometimes, Indian bikers have a lot of things to be grateful for. So, for this thanksgiving, here are a few things bikers in India are thankful for which aren’t available in most foreign countries.

#1 The Variety of Terrain

Road to Mussorie
source: wikipedia.org

India is a country filled with a variety of different terrains which make it a nirvana for road trip enthusiasts. Whether you prefer the winding roads of scenic ghats, long highways to max out your bike or trips to the serene Himalayan mountains, India has the terrains to satiate every riders preference.

Ladakh
source: hlimg.com

 

#2 Bikes available for low prices

source: listofbest.com

 

The Indian motorcycle market is one of the biggest in the world. As such you can get every type of bike you can possibly desire in our country. The best part is the number of low-end bikes (sub 200cc category) that are available at low prices and give excellent mileage (which is extremely important for Indians). This allows a lot of enthusiasts to take up their passion for riding without having to invest a lot of money.

 #3 Easy availabilty of spare parts for customisers

Shivajinagar Gujri, Bangalore
source: thehindu.com

 

There is an huge availability of spare parts for almost every bike in India. Couple that with the presence of chop-shops in even the most remote cities and you have the option for customising your bike any way you want it. This is apparent if you look at the number of pimped out Bullets and Pulsars roaming the streets in every corner of the country.

 #4 Lack of vigilance from Traffic Police on Highways

This is in no way an endorsement to break the rules when you are going on those long trips, but you have to agree that it is a boon that the Indian traffic police aren’t a very prominent presence on the highways unlike most other countries. This means that the speed limits are more like guidelines that aren’t really enforced due to the lack of speed cameras and policemen on the highways. You should always follow the norm of safety first and make sure that you don’t endanger yourself, or anyone else while riding.

 #5 The Royal Enfield Fandom

source: royalenfield.com

For Indian bike enthusiasts, motorcycling is not just an activity, it’s an opportunity to ride together and help the community grow. And the biggest community is undoubtedly the one of Royal Enfield riders. RE is one of the most popular bike makers in India (and also the world) and the number of rider groups help riders socialise with each other and particiapte in events like the Himalayan Odyssey and Rider Mania.

 #6 No category wise licensing according to age and experience

7

Unlike most other countries, if you are aged 18 years or above and have a 2-wheeler license, you can ride any bike from a 100cc Bajaj Splendor to a 1000cc Hayabusa without any extra training or certification requirement.

 #7 Help is always available when your bike breaks down

source: flickr.com

 

If your bike breaks down in India, whether in the middle of a city or in the remotest of villages, there is always a road side mechanic or stranger who will bring your bike back to life with some jugaad (atleast until the nearest service centre). Compared to foreign countries where you would have to call for a towing service, this really is a massive blessing for Indian bikers.

 

Celebrate thanksgiving this year by going on a bike ride and enjoy the benefits of being a biker in India. If you don’t own a bike, you can rent one from Wheelstreet – another great thing for bikers in India.

This article is brought to you by Wheelstreet – India’s first bike rental platform.

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